• 19th April
    2011
  • 19

mamas, don’t let your babies grow up to be trampies.

I spent the weekend with 22 middle and high school students, mostly girls, who were competing at a choir competition in NYC. Part of the weekend’s festivities involved an awards ceremony followed by a dinner and dancing cruise. As we were getting ready for the evening activities, I thought back to similar events on the choir trips I attended in high school. We’d all put on jeans and a nice top, or if we were in a warm location, a cute sundress with flip-flops and maybe a little extra make-up. I had no idea how much things changed in the past few years.

The girls on this boat cruise did not look like they were on a middle/high school choir trip. Now let me disclaimer - none of the girls from our group dressed or behaved like this. I was very proud that all the girls from our group were dressed modestly but still cute. I cannot say as much about the other girls. I saw everything from tight shirts with bras peeking out to skirts that barely covered whatever was underneath. I saw sky-high heels, see-through dresses, and more makeup than a televangelist. It was a cold, windy night and the rain was pouring, yet many girls didn’t even bring a sweater or jacket to cover their bare shoulders. I could understand that if we were in California or Hawaii, but for a trip to NYC in April, I would expect a little more common sense.

When I was in high school there were always a few girls who wore skimpy dresses with overdone hair and make up, but at this event it was the majority of the girls. When did it become a normal thing for middle and high school girls to dress this provocatively?

I read an article this morning that seemed very timely in light of the cruise on Saturday night. The author talks about how girls are dressing provocatively at a younger and younger age, and in most cases it comes back to one thing:

It’s easy to blast companies for introducing the sexy wear, but our ire really should be directed at the parents who think low rise jeans for a second grader is cute. They are the ones who are spending the money to fuel this budding trend. They are the ones who are suppose to decide what’s appropriate for their young children to wear, not executives looking to brew up controversy or turn a profit.

Check out the full article here:

Parents, don’t dress your girls like tramps.

I’m not saying that parents should dress their kids only in denim floor length jumpers. That can cause a whole other set of problems. What I am saying is that those 8 year-olds with fake tans, eye liner and tight sweatpants with “juicy” on the butt are more likely to end up like the boat cruise girls than the 8 year-olds who dress like the actual little girls they are.

I’m not a parent yet, so I can’t say firsthand how hard it is to encourage girls to stay little girls for as long as they can. And I’m sure it’s getting more and more difficult to do so. But as a girl whose parents helped her to not grow up too fast, I know that it’s totally worth the effort.

  • 23rd March
    2011
  • 23
This keeps coming up on the side of my Pandora page. I often listen to Pandora at work when I’m feeling stressed or just need some peace, so during those times in particular I don’t appreciate this message. The worst part is that the ad is animated, so instead of seeing just this image, you see this lady shrink down to an impossible, not proportional size (I’m pretty sure her waist is the same size as her neck).
Way to set unrealistic expectations, Sensa.

This keeps coming up on the side of my Pandora page. I often listen to Pandora at work when I’m feeling stressed or just need some peace, so during those times in particular I don’t appreciate this message. The worst part is that the ad is animated, so instead of seeing just this image, you see this lady shrink down to an impossible, not proportional size (I’m pretty sure her waist is the same size as her neck).

Way to set unrealistic expectations, Sensa.

  • 28th November
    2010
  • 28
from today’s postsecret.
which is actually healthier - a meal rich with food and family, or spending the night alone out of fear?

from today’s postsecret.

which is actually healthier - a meal rich with food and family, or spending the night alone out of fear?

  • 26th November
    2010
  • 26
I get excited when I have the chance to write about messages that inspire a more positive body image. Recently I found out about Operation Beautiful, whose mission is to put an end to “fat talk” for good. It encourages women of all ages to leave positive messages on the mirrors of public restrooms - messages of encouragement, beauty, and hope.
Each day the site posts pictures and stories from women who are posting and finding the notes. I found one of today’s stories particularly inspiring:

After entering a “Biggest Loser” contest at work, Breanne wrote, “I  gained back around 15 of the 25 pounds I had lost during the contest.  And then about a year later I fell back into a “healthy kick” and lost  about 5-10 of those pounds again. And then I got lazy again. It has been  a never-ending cycle with me. Lose weight and feel  good – no matter how unhealthy the manner I do it in is. Then I feel  like I can be lazy for a bit, and I gain back weight. Then I feel like  crap and hate my body. And then I try to be healthy again.  A few days  ago I felt a change in that pattern though. I bought the Operation Beautiful book, and suddenly I realized why none of my “healthy kicks” were working –  it was because I was going about it in entirely the wrong way.   So this time, I plan to stop negative self talk, I plan to eat food  with ingredients I can pronounce, instead of simply rating food by  calorie and fat content, and I plan to avoid setting a specific weight  that I have to reach to feel happy. This time, my goal is to get in  shape, be healthy, and feel good. I do not have a gross, disgusting, or  ugly body. I have a body that can be very strong – one that I can be  proud of it.”

The blog is full of similar stories. I encourage you to check it out, and to post a note or two of your own :)

I get excited when I have the chance to write about messages that inspire a more positive body image. Recently I found out about Operation Beautiful, whose mission is to put an end to “fat talk” for good. It encourages women of all ages to leave positive messages on the mirrors of public restrooms - messages of encouragement, beauty, and hope.

Each day the site posts pictures and stories from women who are posting and finding the notes. I found one of today’s stories particularly inspiring:

After entering a “Biggest Loser” contest at work, Breanne wrote, “I gained back around 15 of the 25 pounds I had lost during the contest. And then about a year later I fell back into a “healthy kick” and lost about 5-10 of those pounds again. And then I got lazy again. It has been a never-ending cycle with me. Lose weight and feel good – no matter how unhealthy the manner I do it in is. Then I feel like I can be lazy for a bit, and I gain back weight. Then I feel like crap and hate my body. And then I try to be healthy again.  A few days ago I felt a change in that pattern though. I bought the Operation Beautiful book, and suddenly I realized why none of my “healthy kicks” were working – it was because I was going about it in entirely the wrong way.  So this time, I plan to stop negative self talk, I plan to eat food with ingredients I can pronounce, instead of simply rating food by calorie and fat content, and I plan to avoid setting a specific weight that I have to reach to feel happy. This time, my goal is to get in shape, be healthy, and feel good. I do not have a gross, disgusting, or ugly body. I have a body that can be very strong – one that I can be proud of it.”

The blog is full of similar stories. I encourage you to check it out, and to post a note or two of your own :)

  • 21st November
    2010
  • 21